Reading Comprehension

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Refer the below paragraph and answer next 5 questions:

The reports published by a Delhi based nongovernment organization working for the elimination of child labour in India suggest that there is no end in sight to the sordid saga of child labour. The studies conducted reveal the nightmarish ordeals that a vast majority of children undergo for getting the basic necessities of life. One of the activists narrated the heart-rending and shocking stories of many hapless children. He accused the society of insensitivity towards this vulnerable section. It is said that more than five percent of the total Indian population are child workers. Tens of thousands are chiefly engaged in agriculture in rural areas and in a variety of industries in urban areas. Children as young as seven years of age spend days stitching footballs, boxing and cricket gloves for export. Many children spend their entire childhood making carpets with their dexterous hands. Unofficial figures suggest that as many as 40 to 100 million children work in hazardous industries like glassware, fireworks, quarries etc. Many of them have been forced to work in unhygienic conditions often on a casual basis.


.................of children work in hazardous conditions.

Millions
yes
Five percent
no
Thousands
no
Many
no
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The society is accused of........... towards the problem of child labour.
Vulnerability
no
Insensitivity
yes
Bias
no
Reports
no
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Their childhood is spent in ………. conditions.
Nightmarish
yes
Hapless
no
Urban
no
Vast
no
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The word heart-rending means......
Distressing
yes
Shocking
no
Painful
no
Risky
no
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The report was published by......
The Delhi government.
no
A governmental organization.
no
An activist.
no
Delhi based non-governmental organization.
yes
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In the technological system of tomorrow – fast, fluid and self-regulating – machines will deal with the flow of physical materials, men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, near instantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home. Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second; men will be desynchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organisation needed to control technology will shift from bureaucracy to Adhocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future. In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs; it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical judgements, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relation-ships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in C.P. Snow’s, compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.

The technological system of tomorrow will be marked by....

Dehumanization
no
Perfection
no
Automation
yes
Unpredictability
no
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‘Near-instantaneous communications’ may be regarded as a symbol of....
Anachronization
no
Mischronization
no
Desynchronization
no
Synchronization
yes
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The type of society which the author has mentioned makes a plea for....
A mind assimilative of modern scientific ideas
no
A critical mind having insight into future
yes
A mind will-versed in cultural heritage
no
A mind with firm principles of life
no
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The future man, according to this passage, must be....
Most adaptive and intelligent
no
Most capable of dealing with the changing reality
yes
More concerned with the present than the future
no
Trained and obedient
no
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If a person believes that ‘the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority’, he is.....
A believer in devotion to duty
no
A believer in taking things for granted
no
A believer in doing what he is told, right or wrong
yes
A believer in the honesty of machines
no
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